CHERRY COOPER

----------------------------------- The Starship Trooper -----------------------------------

In my free time I like to boldly go where no man has gone before


Josephine Baker c. 1930s

Purple: 10 facts about my room.
Blue: 9 facts about my family.
Green: 8 facts about my body
Yellow: 7 facts about my childhood
Orange: 6 facts about my home town.
Red: 5 facts about my bestfriend(s).
Pink: 4 facts about my parents.
White: 3 facts about my personality.
Grey: 2 facts about my favourite things
Black: 1 fact about the person I like.

(Source: keepitfr3sh, via calmer-chameleon)

supermodelgif:


Christy Turlington, Thierry Mugler F/W 1991

Don Featherstone, creator of the pink plastic lawn flamingo. 
supermodelgif:

The Penguin Guide to Children and Hallucinogens
New icon because who wouldn’t want to see this face

yagazieemezi:

Photographer: Thandiwe Muriu
Makeup Artist: Cultured Ego
Model: Anok Kuol

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via beckpoppins)

chubby-bunnies:

nataliemeansnice:

i own the best shirts.
this one is from burgerandfriends.com

inspo

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

(via ladyin-grey)

sometimes people don’t get it but if you choose to be an activist you have to endure the ignorance and be patient in order to teach people

this is not something you are forced to do but if you choose activism it becomes your responsibility

someone was patient enough to teach you about social justice, even if it was indirectly

there is nothing wrong with being angry or venting, or not wanting/being able to explain your politics constantly

but being an activist involves being a teacher, not just a protester

we need patient explanations in order to change people’s minds

having discussions on reddit about how taking plus sized clothes from thrift shops and altering them to fit your size 10 body is kind of wrong since you’re taking away stuff from the already limited supply of low cost plus sized clothing

if you are plus sized and your income is low those clothes are your only option to actually be able to cover your body

not that hard to understand

yay

widebooty:

LOL JESUS

(Source: bowserfucker, via yungwalterwhite)

photojojo:

Back in the early 1970s, thousands of tropical parrots were brought to Japan as pets. As some were freed over the years, the city of Tokyo has developed a fascinating problem: parrot infestation!

Photographer Yoshinori Mizutani noticed the phenomenon shortly after moving to Tokyo, and has been documenting their bizarre presence ever since.

Photos of Tokyo’s Surreal Parrot Infestation 

via It’s Nice That

(via yungwalterwhite)

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